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Computer Security
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COMPUTER SECURITY

EBOOK BY GOLLMANN, DIETER;
ISBN
9781119958758
IMPRINT
WILEY
 
 
EDITION
3RD REVISED EDITION
PUBLISHER
WILEY
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FORMAT
EBOOK
PAGES
456 pages
PUBLICATION DATE
1 DEC 2010

DESCRIPTION

Completely updated and up-to-the-minute textbook for courses on computer science. The third edition has been completely revised to include new advances in software and technology over the last few years. Provides sections on Windows NT, CORBA and Java which are not examined in comparable titles. No active previous experience of security issues is necessary making this accessible to Software Developers and Managers whose responsibilities span any technical aspects of IT security. Written for self-study and course use, this book will suit a variety of introductory and more advanced security programs for students of computer science, engineering and related disciplines. Technical and project managers will also find that the broad coverage offers a great starting point for discovering underlying issues and provides a means of orientation in a world populated by a bewildering array of competing security systems.

CONTENTS

Preface xvii CHAPTER 1 - History of Computer Security 1 1.1 The Dawn of Computer Security 2 1.2 1970s - Mainframes 3 1.3 1980s - Personal Computers 4 1.4 1990s - Internet 6 1.5 2000s - The Web 8 1.6 Conclusions - The Benefits of Hindsight 10 1.7 Exercises 11 CHAPTER 2 - Managing Security 13 2.1 Attacks and Attackers 14 2.2 Security Management 15 2.3 Risk and Threat Analysis 21 2.4 Further Reading 29 2.5 Exercises 29 CHAPTER 3 - Foundations of Computer Security 31 3.1 Definitions 32 3.2 The Fundamental Dilemma of Computer Security 40 3.3 Data vs Information 40 3.4 Principles of Computer Security 41 3.5 The Layer Below 45 3.6 The Layer Above 47 3.7 Further Reading 47 3.8 Exercises 48 CHAPTER 4 - Identification and Authentication 49 4.1 Username and Password 50 4.2 Bootstrapping Password Protection 51 4.3 Guessing Passwords 52 4.4 Phishing, Spoofing, and Social Engineering 54 4.5 Protecting the Password File 56 4.6 Single Sign-on 58 4.7 Alternative Approaches 59 4.8 Further Reading 63 4.9 Exercises 63 CHAPTER 5 - Access Control 65 5.1 Background 66 5.2 Authentication and Authorization 66 5.3 Access Operations 68 5.4 Access Control Structures 71 5.5 Ownership 73 5.6 Intermediate Controls 74 5.7 Policy Instantiation 79 5.8 Comparing Security Attributes 79 5.9 Further Reading 84 5.10 Exercises 84 CHAPTER 6 - Reference Monitors 87 6.1 Introduction 88 6.2 Operating System Integrity 90 6.3 Hardware Security Features 91 6.4 Protecting Memory 99 6.5 Further Reading 103 6.6 Exercises 104 CHAPTER 7 - Unix Security 107 7.1 Introduction 108 7.2 Principals 109 7.3 Subjects 111 7.4 Objects 113 7.5 Access Control 116 7.6 Instances of General Security Principles 119 7.7 Management Issues 125 7.8 Further Reading 128 7.9 Exercises 128 CHAPTER 8 - Windows Security 131 8.1 Introduction 132 8.2 Components of Access Control 135 8.3 Access Decisions 142 8.4 Managing Policies 145 8.5 Task-Dependent Access Rights 147 8.6 Administration 150 8.7 Further Reading 153 8.8 Exercises 153 CHAPTER 9 - Database Security 155 9.1 Introduction 156 9.2 Relational Databases 158 9.3 Access Control 162 9.4 Statistical Database Security 167 9.5 Integration with the Operating System 172 9.6 Privacy 173 9.7 Further Reading 175 9.8 Exercises 175 CHAPTER 10 - Software Security 177 10.1 Introduction 178 10.2 Characters and Numbers 179 10.3 Canonical Representations 183 10.4 Memory Management 184 10.5 Data and Code 191 10.6 Race Conditions 193 10.7 Defences 194 10.8 Further Reading 201 10.9 Exercises 202 CHAPTER 11 - Bell-LaPadula Model 205 11.1 State Machine Models 206 11.2 The Bell-LaPadula Model 206 11.3 The Multics Interpretation of BLP 212 11.4 Further Reading 216 11.5 Exercises 216 CHAPTER 12 - Security Models 219 12.1 The Biba Model 220 12.2 Chinese Wall Model 221 12.3 The Clark-Wilson Model 223 12.4 The Harrison-Ruzzo-Ullman Model 225 12.5 Information-Flow Models 228 12.6 Execution Monitors 230 12.7 Further Reading 232 12.8 Exercises 233 CHAPTER 13 - Security Evaluation 235 13.1 Introduction 236 13.2 The Orange Book 239 13.3 The Rainbow Series 241 13.4 Information Technology Security Evaluation Criteria 242 13.5 The Federal Criteria 243 13.6 The Common Criteria 243 13.7 Quality Standards 246 13.8 An Effort Well Spent? 247 13.9 Summary 248 13.10 Further Reading 248 13.11 Exercises 249 CHAPTER 14 - Cryptography 251 14.1 Introduction 252 14.2 Modular Arithmetic 256 14.3 Integrity Check Functions 257 14.4 Digital Signatures 260 14.5 Encryption 264 14.6 Strength of Mechanisms 270 14.7 Performance 271 14.8 Further Reading 272 14.9 Exercises 273 CHAPTER 15 - Key Establishment 275 15.1 Introduction 276 15.2 Key Establishment and Authentication 276 15.3 Key Establishment Protocols 279 15.4 Kerberos 283 15.5 Public-Key Infrastructures 288 15.6 Trusted Computing - Attestation 293 15.7 Further Reading 295 15.8 Exercises 295 CHAPTER 16 - Communications Security 297 16.1 Introduction 298 16.2 Protocol Design Principles 299 16.3 IP Security 301 16.4 IPsec and Network Address Translation 308 16.5 SSL/TLS 310 16.6 Extensible Authentication Protocol 314 16.7 Further Reading 316 16.8 Exercises 316 CHAPTER 17 - Network Security 319 17.1 Introduction 320 17.2 Domain Name System 322 17.3 Firewalls 328 17.4 Intrusion Detection 332 17.5 Further Reading 335 17.6 Exercises 336 CHAPTER 18 - Web Security 339 18.1 Introduction 340 18.2 Authenticated Sessions 342 18.3 Code Origin Policies 346 18.4 Cross-Site Scripting 347 18.5 Cross-Site Request Forgery 350 18.6 JavaScript Hijacking 352 18.7 Web Services Security 354 18.8 Further Reading 360 18.9 Exercises 361 CHAPTER 19 - Mobility 363 19.1 Introduction 364 19.2 GSM 364 19.3 UMTS 369 19.4 Mobile IPv6 Security 372 19.5 WLAN 377 19.6 Bluetooth 381 19.7 Further Reading 383 19.8 Exercises 383 CHAPTER 20 - New Access Control Paradigms 385 20.1 Introduction 386 20.2 SPKI 388 20.3 Trust Management 390 20.4 Code-Based Access Control 391 20.5 Java Security 395 20.6 .NET Security Framework 400 20.7 Digital Rights Management 405 20.8 Further Reading 406 20.9 Exercises 406 Bibliography 409 Index 423