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ABOUT THIS BOOK
Beginning Linux Programming
£31.99

BEGINNING LINUX PROGRAMMING

PAPERBACK BY MATTHEW, NEIL; STONES, RICHARD

£31.99

ISBN
9780470147627
IMPRINT
WROX PRESS
 
 
EDITION
4TH EDITION
PUBLISHER
JOHN WILEY & SONS INC
STOCK FOR DELIVERY
IN STOCK
FORMAT
PAPERBACK
PAGES
816 pages
PUBLICATION DATE
02 NOV 2007

DESCRIPTION

Beginning Linux Programming, Fourth Edition continues its unique approach to teaching UNIX programming in a simple and structured way on the Linux platform. Through the use of detailed and realistic examples, students learn by doing, and are able to move from being a Linux beginner to creating custom applications in Linux. The book introduces fundamental concepts beginning with the basics of writing Unix programs in C, and including material on basic system calls, file I/O, interprocess communication (for getting programs to work together), and shell programming. Parallel to this, the book introduces the toolkits and libraries for working with user interfaces, from simpler terminal mode applications to X and GTK+ for graphical user interfaces. Advanced topics are covered in detail such as processes, pipes, semaphores, socket programming, using MySQL, writing applications for the GNOME or the KDE desktop, writing device drivers, POSIX Threads, and kernel programming for the latest Linux Kernel.

CONTENTS

Acknowledgements x Foreword xxiii Introduction xxv Chapter 1: Getting Started 1 An Introduction to UNIX, Linux, and GNU 1 Programming Linux 4 Getting Help 14 Summary 16 Chapter 2: Shell Programming 17 Why Program with a Shell? 18 A Bit of Philosophy 18 What Is a Shell? 19 Pipes and Redirection 21 The Shell as a Programming Language 23 Going Graphical The dialog Utility 75 Putting It All Together 81 Summary 91 Chapter 3: Working with Files 93 Linux File Structure 94 System Calls and Device Drivers 96 Library Functions 97 Low-Level File Access 98 The Standard I/O Library 109 Formatted Input and Output 113 File and Directory Maintenance 120 Scanning Directories 122 Errors 127 The /proc File System 128 Advanced Topics: fcntl and mmap 132 Summary 135 Chapter 4: The Linux Environment 137 Program Arguments 137 Environment Variables 144 Time and Date 148 Temporary Files 156 User Information 158 Host Information 161 Logging 163 Resources and Limits 167 Summary 173 Chapter 5: Terminals 175 Reading from and Writing to the Terminal 175 Talking to the Terminal 180 The Terminal Driver and the General Terminal Interface 182 The termios Structure 184 Terminal Output 196 Detecting Keystrokes 205 Summary 209 Chapter 6: Managing Text-Based Screens with curses 211 Compiling with curses 212 Curses Terminology and Concepts 213 The Screen 216 The Keyboard 221 Windows 224 Subwindows 230 The Keypad 232 Using Color 235 Pads 238 The CD Collection Application 240 Summary 254 Chapter 7: Data Management 255 Managing Memory 255 File Locking 264 Databases 281 The CD Application 289 Summary 309 Chapter 8: MySQL 311 Installation 312 MySQL Administration 320 Accessing MySQL Data from C 335 The CD Database Application 358 Summary 375 Chapter 9: Development Tools 377 Problems of Multiple Source Files 377 The make Command and Makefiles 378 Source Code Control 392 Writing a Manual Page 406 Distributing Software 409 RPM Packages 413 Other Package Formats 424 Development Environments 424 Summary 427 Chapter 10: Debugging 429 Types of Errors 429 General Debugging Techniques 430 Debugging with gdb 437 More Debugging Tools 445 Assertions 452 Memory Debugging 453 Summary 459 Chapter 11: Processes and Signals 461 What Is a Process? 461 Process Structure 462 Starting New Processes 468 Signals 481 Summary 493 Chapter 12: POSIX Threads 495 What Is a Thread? 495 Advantages and Drawbacks of Threads 496 A First Threads Program 497 Simultaneous Execution 501 Synchronization 503 Thread Attributes 512 Canceling a Thread 517 Threads in Abundance 520 Summary 524 Chapter 13: Inter-Process Communication: Pipes 525 What Is a Pipe? 525 Process Pipes 526 Sending Output to popen 528 The Pipe Call 531 Parent and Child Processes 535 Named Pipes: FIFOs 540 The CD Database Application 553 Summary 575 Chapter 14: Semaphores, Shared Memory, and Message Queues 577 Semaphores 577 Shared Memory 586 Message Queues 594 The CD Database Application 599 IPC Status Commands 604 Summary 605 Chapter 15: Sockets 607 What Is a Socket? 608 Socket Connections 608 Network Information 624 Multiple Clients 632 Datagrams 642 Summary 644 Chapter 16: Programming GNOME Using GTK+ 645 Introducing X 645 Introducing GTK+ 648 Events, Signals, and Callbacks 655 Packing Box Widgets 658 GTK+ Widgets 661 GNOME Widgets 676 GNOME Menus 677 Dialogs 682 CD Database Application 687 Summary 699 Chapter 17: Programming KDE Using Qt 701 Introducing KDE and Qt 701 Installing Qt 702 Signals and Slots 705 Qt Widgets 712 Dialogs 727 Menus and Toolbars with KDE 733 CD Database Application Using KDE/Qt 738 Summary 746 Chapter 18: Standards for Linux 747 The C Programming Language 748 Interfaces and the Linux Standards Base 751 The Filesystem Hierarchy Standard 755 Further Reading about Standards 758 Summary 759 Index 761