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ABOUT THIS BOOK
Cultural Planning: An Urban Renaissance?
£42.99

CULTURAL PLANNING: AN URBAN RENAISSANCE?

PAPERBACK BY EVANS, GRAEME

£42.99

ISBN
9780415207324
IMPRINT
ROUTLEDGE
 
 
EDITION
PUBLISHER
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD
STOCK FOR DELIVERY
PRINTED ON DEMAND - POD
FORMAT
PAPERBACK
PAGES
352 pages
PUBLICATION DATE
12 JUL 2001

DESCRIPTION

Using an historic and contemporary analysis, Cultural Planning examines how and why the cultures have been planned and the extent to which cultural amenities have been considered in town planning. From its ancient roots in the cities of classical Athenian, Roman and Byzantium empires, to the European Renaissance, public culture shows both an historic continuity and contemporary response to economic and social change. Whilst the arts are considered an extension of welfare provision and human rights, the creative industries and cultural tourism are also vital for economic growth and employment in the post-industrial age. However, the new 'Grand Projects', which look to the arts as an element of urban regeneration, tend to be at the cost of both local cultural amenities and a culturally diverse society. Cultural Planning is the first book on the planning of the arts and culture and the interaction between the state arts policy, the cultural economy and town and city planning. It uses case studies and examples from Europe, North America and Asia. The book calls for the adoption of consultative planning policy, distributive models and a more integrated approach to both culture and urban design, to prevent the reinforcement of existing geographical and cultural divides.

CONTENTS

1: Introduction; 2: The Historical Evolution of City Arts and Cultural Planning; 3: Urban Culture and the early Industrial City; 4: Amenity Planning and the Arts Centre; 5: Models and Standards of Arts Provision; 6: The Cultural Economy - from Arts Amenity to Culture Industry; 7: European Common Culture and Planning for Regional Development; 8: Cities of Culture and the Urban Renaissance; 9: Planning for the Arts: An Urban Renaissance?